NJR Honours Projects for 2018

Here’s my list of Honours projects for 2018. If you are keen to do one of these, please email me or drop by to discuss.

1. University of Auckland Ground Station 1

The University’s first CubeSat mission is scheduled to fly late 2018. We have a ground station on top of the Physics building to communicate with satellites. This station requires final calibration and testing, and development of corresponding control and analysis software. This work will be done in conjunction with the Auckland Programme for Space Systems, using the new APSS laboratories on Symonds Street and the Department of Physics Electronics Laboratory. You will be working with students and staff in the Faculty of Engineering, as well as in the Faculty of Science. You will also assist in the preparation to communicate with the first APSS satellite mission via the Defence Technology Agency’s ground station, working with DTA staff to ensure a smooth connection between the DTA systems and the University network.

This will be of interest to you if:

  • you have a reasonable grasp of radio communications,
  • good electronics / lab skills,
  • good computer network skills,
  • excellent written and oral communication skills,
  • an interest in space system hardware.
Listen and track satellites and help us get ready for launch in 2018!

Listen and track satellites and help us get ready for launch in 2018!

 

2. Hauraki Gulf Space Observation Honours Projects

Coastal science is both complex and complicated. There is a lack of detailed information on the interaction between ocean and coast, the coastal ecology and the relationships between the coastal environment and life on and near the coast. Each of the following projects relates to an overall goal of imaging the Hauraki Gulf from space. These earth observation projects are multi-disciplinary and will be carried out in conjunction with the Department of Marine Science and the Department of Engineering Science in the Faculty of Engineering.

2a. Geosynchronous CubeSat Feasibility Study

For this project you will scope and design a small satellite system that is capable of imaging the Hauraki Gulf to a few metres resolution from a geosynchronous orbit. These image data will be used to measure coastal sea colour, elevation, turbidity and reflectance. You will need to investigate commercial off the shelf optics and imaging systems that can provide the necessary resolution, and can operate within the power, volume, mass and communication bandwidth budgets of a small satellite system bus. You will need a good grounding in optics, electronics and some signal processing. Experience in space systems is not required. You must have excellent written and oral communication skills as you will be required to interact with a range of individuals both across different University Faculties and Departments, as well as external hardware and service providers.

This will be of interest to you if:

  • you have an interest in space system mission design,
  • good electronics / optics skills,
  • familiarity with signal processing and data analysis,
  • excellent written and oral communication skills.

2b. Earth Observation Satellite Data Analysis

This project will require you to make a census of the available satellite imaging and radar data of the Hauraki Gulf. A number of existing satellite missions make their data freely available, such as ESA’s Sentinel optical and synthetic aperture radar satellites. You will investigate what sources of data are available, summarise basic meta data of each data source (e.g. how often images are taken, wavelengths, resolutions, etc). You will work with satellite imaging experts both in Auckland and at the Centre for Space Science Technology to identify modes of imaging that will provide the information required to address the science goals of the project — or identify a need for more imaging. You will also use existing analysis software to do preliminary data analysis for suitable datasets.

This will be of interest to you if:

  • you have an interest space-based data analysis,
  • very good programming skills,
  • familiarity with image analysis,
  • excellent written and oral communication skills.

 

3. Design a UV space telescope mission to detect intermediate mass black holes

Intermediate mass black holes are theorised to exist in our Galaxy. They are difficult to detect, however. One channel for discovery is by looking for tidal disruption flares (TDFs), wherein a companion to a black hole is disrupted the the gravitational distortion of the BH and emits bursts of radiation. These transient events are highly energetic, but emit most of the radiation in the UV, making ground-based observations only sensitive to the brightest events. This project will be to design a small satellite to make UV observations from space, in order to detect fainter TDFs. You will be working with colleagues at The University of Warsaw.

This will be of interest to you if:

  • you have an interest in space system mission design,
  • you have a good background in — or at least a strong interest in — astronomy or astrophysics,
  • good electronics / optics skills,
  • excellent written and oral communication skills.

 

4. Astronomical Seeing Measurements in the Greater Auckland Area.

One of the Department’s 40 cm Meade telescopes has been converted into a seeing monitor. Seeing is a measure of atmospheric turbulence.┬áThis project will involve the student making seeing observations at various sites in the Greater Auckland area, analysing the results and publishing these.┬áThe student will have to be comfortable working at night, and have a full driver’s licence. You will make seeing measurements using the dedicated software written for the instrument, as well as a commercial seeing analysis package and compare the results.

Use one of these!

 

This will be of interest to you if:

  • you have an interest in astronomy,
  • very good programming skills,
  • familiarity with image analysis,
  • excellent written and oral communication skills.

 

5. Multidimensional Dataset Visualisation with an Oculus Rift

This project will require the student to investigate multidimensional astronomical datasets using an Oculus Rift. Students should have a high level of programming ability. You will be using the iViz visualisation software from Virtualitics (no experience necessary).

This will be of interest to you if:

  • you have an interest in data analysis, and human-computer interaction,
  • excellent programming skills,
  • excellent written and oral communication skills.

Oculus Rift DK2

 

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